Ghanzi is also known as ‘The capital of the Kalahari’ and is situated amongst a flat and featureless terrain, with bushes, thorn trees and grasslands coming alive in the rainy season.it has an altitude od about 900m above the sea level, It is some 200km to the Namibia border post to the east or 300km to Maun to the west. The tarred roads are excellent and Ghanzi is served by its own airfield. Ghanzi is also a stopover point for travellers en-route to the Okavango Delta and Moremi Game Reserve.

Employment in Ghanzi centres around cattle farming that supplies the Botswana Meat Commission with most of the required beef produce. There are also several RAD (Remote Area Development) settlements in the area, providing basic social services like schools and health facilities.

Bushmen (Basarwa) once dominated the region. Their survival strategies had been perfected over the centuries for living in such an inhospitable environment. They were joined later by the Bakgalagadi and gradually left to live in the Kalahari villages such as Ncojane, Matsheng and Kang.

After the Bushmen, it was the turn of Hottentots to settle in the Ghanzi area, tending large herds of cattle. In 1874, the first white settlers arrived, led by Hendrik van Zyl, a flamboyant character whose legend lives on in Ghanzi, as does the remains of his once magnificent house. Boer trekkers followed in the late 1890’s, lured by attractive business propositions. It turned out that the farm leases had been fraudulently acquired from Tawana Chief Moremi in Maun by Cecil Rhodes’ ‘legal